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22. that is very serious. in the age of technology and the information age, we produce 70% of engineers. china produces 400,000 engineers. you know, this is serious stuff. we're talking about the future and our role in the future. and we need to begin to make adjustments. we need to make them quite soon. we cannot sit around and be enamored of support and entertainment and sports and glitz and glamour. i think we all get it. because we are the pinnacle nation in the world right now. have another pinnacle nation's forests. ancient egypt, greece. clinical nations. number one, no competition. going to be there forever. or so they thought. so what happened to each and every one of them? basically they became enamored with sports and entertainment and lifestyles of the rich and famous. they turned a blind eye to political corruption. they lost their moral compass and went right down the tubes. some will say that actually happened to the united states. but i think an honest assessment would demonstrate that it is already in the process of happening. the real question is can we b
house, they are already doing things with technology innovation. he is coming here to us -- to spotlight the kinds of things he is talking about how colleges can lower the cost and still maintain a good education. he will start here and then go to a high school in syracuse. as you mentioned, this is all part of a larger strategy based on what he calls the middle class programs. over the past several weeks he has given several speeches on different aspects of the programs. he talked about housing and of other city. he says education is the key to middle-class. are college graduate, a better class of entering the economy and making more of an income. even on top of that, he was on vacation last week, now getting back to the real grind. we're heading into september where we will look at budgets. the fiscal year ends september 30 and the temporary spending bill ends on september 30. if the president and congress cannot agree on a new spending plan, the government will shut down. i think you are also hearing him make his pitch for how we should handle the budget going forward. for the proposa
, when technology breaks down it can be costly. amazon lost millions when its site went offline. nasdaq's shut down brought billions in trading to a complete halt. tonight, cramer's zeroing in on the top plays to keep your portfolio protected. >>> plus, you ask. he answers. >> i'm wondering about susq. susquehanna. >> i got to do the homework. i'm not ready to give you an answer. >> you sent cramer back to the books. now he's got the answers you need. >>> plus, jim responds to your tweets. @jimcramer #mad tweets. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer. #madtweets. send jim an e-mail to madmoney at cnbc.com. or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. when we made our commitment to the gulf, bp had two big goals: help the gulf recover and learn from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monit
unfree. and over some number of decades became much for your and much were democratic. >> does technology eventually make democracy inevitable? >> one of the observations that we can with actually came from me and mark. we were in the mr a little over a month ago, less than 1% as access to the unit. one of the worst decade shift in the entire world. now it's in some country and session. still very much speculative about whether its democratic transition. what was interesting about myanmar and perhaps something that shocked even us is even the less than 1% of the population has access to the internet everyone had heard of it. they understood the unit as a set of values, as a concept as an id even before they experienced it as a user or a tool. the understanding was not based on a chinese interpretation but it was not based on autocrats version. they understood in terms of its western value of the free flow of information and civil liberties. what that means to us is your 57% of the world's population living under some kind of an autocracy. what happens when they try to create an autocratic
-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." you can follow me on facebook and @ed show, all that good stuff in the social media. we love hearing from viewers. tonight in our ask ed live segment, the question comes from cordel garrett, do you think some on the right are itching for a race war in this country? god for bid. talk about transparency. our producers put that question up. i think we in the media have a responsibility to tone things down when it gets hot. if you know what i mean. no, i don't think there's going to be a race war in america. and i don't think there are some when you say some on the right, i mean, three, four, ten, thousands, whatever? i'm trying to answer this as directly as i can. i don't think there's going to be a race war in america nor would i ever advocate that. but i think that conservatives will do just a
for work? automation and technology make it so that in fact we need fewer human hands in a bunch of arenas where we used to so that means we have to think about work quite differently and about the society needs for the contribution. and i think that we will have our best chance at getting to some of those changes if we have a really fully multiracial, multi justice movement and that is explicit about race and the way that gordon has mentioned that engages everybody that has a stake in taking their racial order a part. the changing demographics of america present such an opportunity for us. we are coming into a period that we can redefine what it means to be american because for too long that has been a title that has been captured and owned by white folks. and many of us that have been here for 200, 300 years, since the very beginning since before there were white folks, you know, it really is not feeling like we were american. we were the other. so we are in a moment where we are getting ready to actually calotte back and own what it means to be american and i think from that will come a
, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: walt mossberg, has technology plateaued? >> guest: oh, no, absolutely not. absolutely not. technology is always changing and always coming up with -- technology companies are always coming up with something new, and there are new technology companies all the time incubating, a lot of them are in what we call stealth mode. we don't even know who they are. certain technologies plateau and things move on, but in general, no. not at all. >> host: i guess i ask that because the last couple years we've had the explosion of smartphones, we've had tablets come online. what's out there? >> guest: well, first of all, there are vast numbers of people especially in the less developed cups, but even in the developed countries who don't own a smartphone and, certainly, there are vast thurms that don't own -- numbers that don't own a tablet. to give you a rough example, apple -- which leads in the tablet market -- has sold somewhere around 160 million ipads since 2010. that's a remarkable achievement and for people that own appl
technology that would produce the steel for less than half the price. these big ingots take specialties that can be used in high-tech industries. they got the money together, they converted, and they are the fifth largest steel company in employees.0 the average pay was $85,000 a year. it never made it to television. i believe we lost the election in that moment. there were other, institutional reasons why we did not do it. we have to understand those and make sure it does not happen again. the romney campaign was out of money because they spent it all in the primary. they had a lot of money earmarked for the general election and they could not spend it until after the republican convention. all of the money could not be spent except for a portion of it on political communication. they've ran negative issue ads against obama tom a -- against obama, but they never felt able to answer the bain capital for fear of the tax exempt status. i kept telling them the irs would cut you slack.but those accountants did not believe me. let's make sure we don't make the same mistake again because we c
life and the transplant surgerying with the whole body of technology and development of medicine, cleats cholesterol, we tell that story through my case and laid against the background of my time in public service. and i was uniquely blessed in many respects, obviously, you can never express enough gratitude for a donor or the donor's family. you cannot talk about what i went through and i survived it what without talking about liz, her sister, and my wife. we celebrate our 40th wedding anniversary next week. [applause] i -- when you go through everything we went through as a family, and the only way to go through it is as a family, if at all possible. i wake up every morning with a smile on my face thankful for a new day i never expected to see. and basically what the book is about, it's simon and shuster love it. it's called heart, american medical odyssey. i think it's a pretty good book. it's not political. it has nothing to do with politics. i suppose you could say that all of pry my critics say i never had a heart. [laughter] may want to have that problem -- this challenge
. some lead in industrial and technological revolution. some in world war ii. arlington cemetery, so close to where we are right now, we can hear the whisper of those brave names, sullivan, fernandez. today, 50 million american latinos demand our rights, rights given to us not by the man who fell in philadelphia who themselves are immigrants and children of immigrants. no, the rights are given to us by god. what we demand is simple. first, we are americans. treat us as such, invest in our neighborhoods, our house, our education. second, we demand a vote. tear down the barriers to voting, don't bring us more. finally, and the second-class citizenship of 5 million children in 6 million parents.♪ >> our next two speakers, professor charles ogletree, harvard law school, and chair of the united we dream, sofia campos. >> thank you so much. it is a pleasure being here. let me say this first, i want to salute our first african- american governor elected twice in massachusetts, deval patrick. i want to support the great lawyers from florida who represented the families of trayvon martin, d
then, a conversation on the latest air traffic technology with the director of civil aviation with the accountability office. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ it isgood morning, monday, august 26, 2013. president obama is scheduled to hold meetings at the white house today as a ministration officials reveals a list of targets for potential strikes in the syrian government in response to last week's suspected to michael attack. even though congress is not scheduled to return to session for two more weeks, several key lawmakers took to the sunday shows yesterday to discuss u.s. options in syria. in some cases they pressed the white house to act. and as we take you through the latest on the syrian situation, we want to hear your thoughts. should the united states take new action in syria and if so what should that action be? it is a call, our phone lines are open. republicans can call-in at -- you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media pages, on twitter and facebook, or e-mail us at journal@c- span.org. good monday morning to you. t
and how we can use technology to provide benefits to employers. jon: i have a daughter going place to place with a paper resume, essentially. what did you come up? >> we have a mobile exchange. by 2015, more people will use it on the mobile phones than computers. applying for service support work, need a very easy way to show themselves. someone comes into the store, the manager can point them to the kiosk and the candidate can actually hear an angry customer. how would you respond to the customer? and then they say how they would handle the person come in the store jon: it's geared toward clerks and restaurant workers. >> most of the jobs are in restaurant and retail industries. i believe there needs to be an easier way so this solution provides a much better information to the company and a much, much more pleasant experience for the candidates that are so often candidates. jon: how has it been received? >> we launched this product literally three months ago and it's been unbelievable. we're working from the smallest stores up to the big ones who roll across 44 stores, recently i
's god's will. >> reporter: though the amish typically shy away from modern technology, sarah hershberger's father agreed to do a phone interview. her parents initially agreed to chemo. after a month, the tumors shrunk. but the side effects became too much for her to handle. >> if we do chemotherapy and she would happen to die, she would probably suffer more than if we would do it this way. and she would happen to die. >> reporter: so, in june, they stopped the treatment. with chemotherapy, her doctors say she has an 85% chance of survival. without it, she could die within a year. in july, the hospital took the family to court, seeking temporary guardianship. in a statement to abc news, the hospital attorney, lobbying to take over sarah's care says, i believe there can be no doubt that it is in her best interest to have chemotherapy and have a chance to live a full life. >> the state's interest in protecting the child's life is going to be considered compelling. and at the end of the day, i think that it's going to override the parents' rights. >> reporter: for "good morning america," ale
and maintaining our technological upgradinge are not our roads and our bridges and our transportation systems in our infrastructure, all things that we can afford to do right now and should be doing right now and would put people to work right now -- if we don't do those things, then 20 years from now, already years from now, we will have fallen further and further behind. when we get back to washington, when congress gets back to washington, this is going to be a major debate. this is the same debate we have been having for the last two years. the difference is now the ready coming down here what we should be thinking about is how do we grow an economy so that we are creating a thriving middle class and more ladders of opportunity for those who are willing to work hard to get into the middle class. and my position is going to be that we can have a budget that is sensible, that is not spent on programs that don't work, but it does spend wisely on those things that will help ordinary people succeed. all right? good. -- it is a general mental the turn. this gentleman right here has had his hand
. energy, technology, i was on the ways and means committee in the house. host: first call is from arkansas, independent line. this is jim for byron dorgan. good morning. jim, go ahead. before weime for jim move on. caller: hello? host: you are on, sir. derek, florida. republican line. caller: good morning. i just wanted to ask the senator newt was familiar with gingrich's book "one second after," which was really quite a terrifying novel concerning electromagnetic pulse weapons. guest: only generally familiar with it, familiar with the title and that it was written. it was referenced, our book, by "the new york times was quote -- by "the new york times" about a week ago. host: what other issues are you interested in, caller? caller: i was wondering about the implications of that component, in terms of cyber warfare and the protection of the great. one of the comments i would like to make -- not comments, but do you -- i'm sorry, i am a mind blanking here. host: why do we let the senator respond to the issue of electromagnetic pulses? guest: not something unfamiliar a lot about. i'm familia
took on a broken health care system. we invested in new technologies to achieve energy independence. we changed our tax code that was tilted too much in favor of folks who were doing very well at the expense of working families. we started to crack down on some of the practices we had seen in the financial sector that got us into this mess in the first place. and because of that work, our businesses today have created 7.3 million new jobs over the last 41 months. we're generating more energy than ever before. we sell more goods made in america to other countries than ever before. manufacturing is starting to come back and insource instead of outsource. health care costs are growing at the slowest rate in 50 years. our deficits are falling at the fastest rate in the 60 years. so thanks to the grit and recyience and hard work of the american people, and some good policies, we've been able to clear away the rubble of the financial crisis. we're laying the foundation for an economy that works for everybody. but i'll bet a lot of families in scranton will tell you, we're not yet where we nee
a very different function. you have to help kids understand technology. 80% of parents and what they were worried about was bullying by other kids and that's a staggering thing. that happens when kids are not kept busy, not cap energized. he said quite correctly, with the corners and so on, they are energized but in a lot of classes they are not and that is when idle hands to the the devil'sdo w work. that is where the common core may make that up so we do not have all of these answer factories where they are teaching kids to sift through this stuff and figure out what is true. >> i make sure to keep my students not busy but engaged, engaged in learning. that is what encourages them to come to school everyday. when i do science projects -- and we do science every single day -- i tell them tomorrow we are going to make mystery meat. ?nd they are like, what's that you code your have to to school to find out. when i did this particular lesson, we were doing liquids, solids, gases and that is where the mystery meat came into play. a parent said, we have a dental appointment and it's been on t
- safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. and didn't know where to start. a contractor before at angie's list, you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare written by people just like you. no company can pay to be on angie's list, so you can trust what you're reading. angie's list is like having thousands of close neighbors, where i can go ask for personal recommendations. that's the idea. before you have any work done, check angie's list. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. i love you, angie. sorry, honey. >>> donald trump likes to say you're fired. now new york attorney general is saying to trump you're sued. eric schneiderman has filed a $40 million lawsuit geanes trump saying he has helped to run what
air technology. at the simple touch of a button, the sleep number mattress adjusts to your ideal level of comfort and support, with exceptional pressure relief on each side. experience the newest innovation from sleep number: the only bed that knows you. and there's only one place in the world you'll find the sleep number bed: at one of our 425 stores nationwide. where at our biggest sale of the year, every sleep number bed is on sale. queen mattresses now start at just $599. and save an incredible 40% on the sleep number limited edition memory foam mattress sets. sleep number. comfort individualized. police say an elderly driver lost control of the car and on hansom >>> a car slams into a house in oakland setting it on fire. police say an elderly driver lost control of the car and crashed into the home on anson drive in the oakland hills yesterday. the impact dislodged the gas meter and the garage went up in flames. the neighbor rescued the driver, who was shaken but not injured. >>> the city of san diego has reached a tentative deal with bob filner involving a sexual harassment suit filed again
no modern technology. but a hit reality show is painting this peaceful christian community as brimming with intrigue and controversy. >> the mafia operates outside of amish law. >> reporter: "the amish mafia," in its second season, airing tonight on discovery channel follows this man, "lebanon levi," and his assistants, who purportedly look after the amish community here in lancaster county, and do the dirty work the church can't. >> levi's a great guy, but if you cross him, he's not afraid to crack some skulls. >> reporter: they are said to work as an internal police system that takes the matters of their community into their own hands. they also keep an eye on the teenagers, who take time off to experience the outside world before committing their lives to the sect. >> i make sure the peace is being kept and everybody is obeying the rules. >> reporter: as a whole, the amish deny the existence of the amish mafia. much of the show's content has been strongly criticized by amish scholars. questions have even been raised as to whether some of the cast members are actors. but producers sa
's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. where would you go?iving away a trip every day. woman: 'greece.' woman 2: 'i want to go to bora bora.' man: 'i'd always like to go to china.' anncr: download the expedia app and your next trip could be on us. expedia, find yours. >>> time for some sports and east coast new york media bias. we begin with the new york yankees taking on the blue jays. robinson canoe takes a fastball. mri came out negative. soriano two home runs, 400th of his career. yankees win the game still hanging around in the wild card. shane victorino helped in the pasting of the orioles. all about leather. two teams, robby grossman, a nice diving catch on a soft line drive there. next inning he snags this sinking liner. chicago won the game 4-3. they creep to within 21 out of first place. they are the most profitable, forbes says the astros on pace for $99 million in profit this season making them the most profitable team in history. really? >> they have a payroll. >> check out this play.
of a frustration at the end of the day did people lose money? no. this is a different type of technology glitch and not one that should cause major shelfer concern. >> reporter: again what i was saying had this happened on a day where there was really big news like the monthly employment report or fed meeting this would have been a different story. this would have been a migraine. >> we turn to sports, developing news in the case of a former nfl player. >> reporter: tight end aaron hernandez is one step closer to possibly facing life in prison. hernandez indicted on a first-degree murder charge in the death of a former friend. defense attorneys for hernandez said evidence against him is circumstantial. and the international olympic committee say russians have guaranteed them that athletes and partners will be protected from anti-gay feeling. mission. >> there's more to ame >> the syrian regime seems to be confident. they've heard those words before. russia, china block any resolution or any statements demanding an official investigation on exactly what happened in the suburbs of damascus. so at
and sophistication in targeting technologies. he is with the department of technology. >> let's see how this works. imagine there is a couple out there expecting a baby, and they go on line immediately to look up the word pregnancy. what happens? >> right away they've shared with google that they're interested in pregnancy. so they can add that to the profile and then i start clicking on links. >> with every click powerful marketing companies drop electronic cookies onto our couple's track to record their browsing history, what they looked at and for how long, and how much they spend. some may even link to the couple's real world shopping habits, noting that they purchased a home pregnancy test. ask sudden and suddenly in their e-mails, on their smartphones, on social media sites comes an avalanche of ads for baby strollers, car seats, cribs and much more. >> and all of this could happen before the couple even tells their family that they're pregnant. >> yeah, there are hundreds of companies in the advertising game, and they could drop a cookie saying this person is searching pregnancy. >> if you
partnered with hp to build the new nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> in california, authorities are trying to solve a mystery that has a family and a school community on edge. they're looking for a popular pennsylvania high school math teacher who vanished during a hiking trip to mammoth lakes. 39-year-old matthew green would have started classes tomorrow but he hasn't been seen or heard from since mid-july. >> i want to be hopeful but yet at this point it's so hard to be hopeful. >> reporter: it's hard because her brother matthew green is missing. the avid
center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. with 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. [ crisp crunches ] whoo-hoo-hoo! guess it was. [ male announcer ] pringles, bursting with more flavor. ♪ and now there's a new way to do the same for your dog.s. introducing new purina dog chow light & healthy. it's a no-sacrifices, calorie-light way to help keep him trim... ...with a deliciously tender and crunchy kibble blend he'll love... ...and 20% fewer calories than dog chow. discover the lighter side of strong. new purina dog chow light & healthy. >> i vhave a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> when martin luther king delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago there were five africa
back. it's like crack. >> and social robotist heather knight, who brings a human touch to technology. >> i have this idea where maybe we come to place where we replace not people by robots but tutsiers computers by rob ots. how about make making computers more human. their stories this saturday on "the next list," 2:30 eastern. [ engine revving ] ♪ [ male announcer ] it's a golden opportunity to discover the heart-pounding exhilaration beyond the engineering. ♪ come to the golden opportunity sales event to experience the precision handling of the lexus performance vehicles, including the gs and all-new is. ♪ this is the pursuit of perfection. ♪ the math of retirement is different today.ek. money has to last longer. i don't want to pour over pie charts all day. i want to travel, and i want the income to do it. ishares incomes etfs. low cost and diversified. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and
in the technology age, smartphone apps helping you diagnose your children. i this safe? former governor mike huckabee says he knows how to fix the obama care mess. we've got his three-step diagnosis straight ahead. wit's hard to find contractors with the passion and the skill, and that's why we use angie's list. online or on the phone, we help you hire right the first time with honest reviews on over 720 local services. i want it done right. i don't want to have to worry about it or have to come back and redo it. with angie's list, i was able to turn my home into the home of my dreams. for over 18 years, we've helped people take care of the things that matter most. join today. the math of retirement is different today.ek. money has to last longer. i don't want to pour over pie charts all day. i want to travel, and i want the income to do it. ishares incomes etfs. low cost and diversified. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and e
with technology innovation to help lower costs, so he's coming here to spotlight the kinds of things he's talking about in terms of how colleges can lower their costs and yet still maintain a good education. so he'll start here and then he'll go to a high school in syracuse where he'll also talk to students who are about to enter college and their parents who are about to pay for it. this is all part of a larger strategy based on what he calls his middle class program, and over the past several weeks he's given several speeches on different aspects of this program. he talked about jobs in one city, infrastructure in another city, housing in yet another city. he says it's education that he says is the key to the middle class. we're a knowledge many economy. if you're a college graduate, you've got a better chance of entering that knowledge economy and making more of an income. and on top of that, you know, basically he was on vacation last week, now he's getting back to the real grind, and we're heading into september where we're going to be looking at a lot of budget fights. the fiscal year ends
patient care so holistically. places such advanced technology in the hands of practitioners. has the privilege of caring exclusively for our nation's veterans. there's no other system like the veterans health administration. ♪ bring your medical and healthcare skills to va. visit vacareers.va.gov. good evening, this is flo. [laughs] yes, i'm that flo. aren't you sweet! licensed phone-ups available 24/7. call 1-800-progressive. the rim fire is burning outf control and firefighters d't know when they can contain . weather ad lib >>> flames shooting up to six stories high near yosemite. the rim fire is burning out of control and firefighters don't know when they can contain it. >> looks like the weather is calming down here but could see some thunderstorms in far northern california. we'll talk about that coming up. >> and bart just sent out an alert. there are 15- to 20-minute delays on the pittsburg-bay point line. we get a mass transit check coming up. >>> good morning. it's thursday, august 22. i'm frank mallicoat. good to have you with us. >> i'm michelle griego. time now is
integrates patient care so holistically. places such advanced technology in the hands of practitioners. has the privilege of caring exclusively for our nation's veterans. there's no other system like the veterans health administration. ♪ bring your medical and healthcare skills to va. visit vacareers.va.gov. ground yesterday on a new s near the shark's tank in san jose. the store will feature chain's first >>> for whole foods, business is booming. the grocery chain broke ground yesterday on a new store near the shark tank in san jose. the store will feature the chain's first microbrewery and rooftop beer gardens. some question whether it's too high-end for the neighborhood. >> i'm glad that it's in the downtown vicinity from walking distance from other downtown neighborhoods. but i think our more lower income neighborhoods, people won't be able to afford the high-priced grocery store. >> whole foods says it will offer a wide range of prices and will hire 100 workers when it opens next summer. >>> every year retailers try to outdo each other by being the first to put up christmas decoratio
-- [ applause ] we invested in new technologies. we started reversing our addiction to foreign oil. we changed a tax code that was tilted too far in favor of the wealthy at the expense of working families. add it all up, today our businesses have created 7.3 million new jobs over the last 41 months. we now generate more renewable energy than ever before, we sell more goods made in america the rest of the world than ever, health care costs are growing at the slowest rate in 50 years, our deficits are falling at the fastest rate in 60 years. here in buffalo, the governor and the mayor were describing over $1 billion in investment, river front being changed, construction booming. signs of progress. so thanks to the grit and the resilience of the american people, we've cleared away the rubble from the financial crisis. we've started to lay the foundation for a stronger, more durable economic growth. but, as any middle class family will tell you, folks here in buffalo will tell you, we're not where we need to be yet. because even before the crisis hit and a town like buffalo knows something about t
's easier than ever to experience deep, restful sleep with the sleep number bed's dualair technology. at the simple touch of a button, the sleep number mattress adjusts to your ideal level of comfort and support, with exceptional pressure relief on each side. experience the newest innovation from sleep number: the only bed that knows you. and there's only one place in the world you'll find the sleep number bed: at one of our 425 stores nationwide. where at our biggest sale of the year, every sleep number bed is on sale. queen mattresses now start at just $599 . and save an incredible 40% on the sleep number limited edition memory foam mattress sets. sleep number. comfort individualized. still running in the morning? yeah. getting your vegetables every day? when i can. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. two full servings of vegetables for only 50 delicious calories. >>> you may have missed this, and it's not something we normally do on this show. it has nothing to do with politics, everything to do with citizenship. we got the 911 audiotape today from the school shooting
who's graduating ready for a great career in technology. [ male announcer ] in 2012, 90% of devry university grads actively seeking employment had careers in their field in 6 months. join the 90%. learn how at devry.edu. [ kitt ] you know what's impressive? a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ >>> all week we have been having a late summer cookout, introducing you to my favorite food and beverage stock. if you like to play it more defensively after the big run, maybe you should. now, monday i told you that hain celestial, the organic and natural food, behind the garden of eden, and a host of other brands was best of breed in this space. so you can consider buying some ahead of the quarter which hain reported, well, just last night. sure enough, the company blew them away. they delivered a 3 cent up and subs
. together, we took on a broken health care system. we invested in new technologies. [applause] we started reversing our addiction to foreign oil. we changed a tax code that was tilted to far in favor of the wealthy at the expense of working families.[applause] and add it all up, today our businesses have created 7.3 million new jobs over the last 41 months. we now generate more renewable energy than ever before. we sell more goods made in america to the rest of the world than ever. health care costs are growing at the slowest rate in 50 years. our deficits are falling at the fastest rate in 60 years. here in buffalo, the governor and the mayor were describing over a billion dollars in investment, riverfront being changed, construction booming -- signs of progress.[applause] so thanks to the grit and the resilience of the american people, we've cleared away the rubble from the financial crisis. we've started to lay the foundation for a stronger, more durable economic growth. but as any middle-class family will tell you, as folks here in buffalo will tell you, we're not where we need to be
living through a decade where almost all the productivity gains, all the benefits of technology were accruing at the very top. and the average family had seen their incomes and wages flat or actually go down a little bit. most families were working harder and harder just to get by. costs of everything elsewhere going up. but your wages and your incomes weren't going up. so reversing that trend, returning to the days when if you're willing to work hard you can succeed, that should be washington's highest priority. that should be washington's highest priority. that's joe's highest priority. that's bob casey's highest priority. that's my highest priority. that's what we should be focused on every single day. but we do have a problem, which is we've got some of our friends down in washington who, and you know, it's not all republicans. but there's a strong faction. who instead of focusing on what's helping middle class families succeed, they're spending time arguing about whether or not we should be paying the bills for things we already spend money on. they're threatening to shut down t
technology to integrate into our infrastructure, we are going to have to think more about what are the vulnerabilities and where do they come from? >> and the sec says officials want to meet with exchange and marketing executives about this, jon. >> what more do we know about the glitch? >> despite concerns hackers infiltrated the exchange. nasdaq says there is no evidence of a intruder on computer network or of a large coordinated attack. nasdaq simply blames a technical problem. jon? >> jon: rich, yesterday's glitch just the latest embarrassment for the nasdaq. a few months ago it agreed to pay the largest penalty every against the stock exchange $10 million to settle charges over how it handled trading and glitches when facebook went public. those glitches among other things tanked facebook's stock prices but the social network apparently has bounced back and then some. today, it closed above $40 for the first time. two bucks a share more than its initial price. and check out this chart showing the past three months, prices up more than 50% since july. the man who took over
stepping down. technology rules the world and all this while facebook's mark zuckerberg says he wants to wire the world. i'm christine romans. this is "your money." nasdaq's nightmare put your
's efforts on immigration. >> because of these investments in man power and technology and infrastructure, our borders are now better staffed and better protected than any time in our nation's history. and illegal crossings have dropped to near 40-year lows. >> she's leaving to become the first female president of the university of california system. president obama has not yet named a successor. those are the things we just thought you should know. >>> all right. time for the "news nation" gut check. south carolina's capital city columbia is raising some eyebrows over its plan to kick homeless people out of the city's downtown area. it's part of the city's homeless emergency response plan and bans homeless people from a 36-block area in the business district. under the policy, they will be offered three options. one, go to jail. two, leave town. or three, go to a shelter on the outskirts of the city. now, columbia city council approved the plan last week with supporters arguing the approximately 1500 members of the city's homeless population are preventing the city from becoming an econo
success of that march encouraged other people to do the same thing. secondly, almost every technological change since then from satellite television to arena video screens and sound systems have made marches more accessible, just more feasible. you see the cascading number of marches to the point where the noted martin luther king the type hass, been debased by repetition. asx significant difference we have listened to a number of oral histories, the organizational work it took to put this work together with more than 200,000 in the sum estimated 250,000, well before e-mail and twitter and other social media, this is truly a grassroots effort. a lot has changed in terms of ideology 50 years later. has that impacted the value of these marches? klux guest: carried topeech was nations around the world by satellite, and broadcast live on the only three broadcast networks, today, it would take in a norma's event to get that kind of attention. get thatus event to kind of attention. people's attention span for various reasons has been so changed, that you really have to fight to break through t
also held top positions at the massachusetts institute of technology and the george washington university. right,-- to my far andrew young, an aide to martin luther king. young helped organize the march on washington. in addition he was a former congressman, a former mayor of atlanta, and a former ambassador to the united issues. he is currently professor at the andrew young skill -- school of policy studies at georgia state. ifill,eft, gwen reporter, moderator and managing "washington week vicehe has moderated two presidential debates, and before that she worked for nbc, and "the washington post," and she is regarded as one of the best. my right, julian bond, one of the leaders of the civil rights movement. studentd found the nonviolent coordinating committee. he was also elected to the georgia house and senate. he has been a radio and television almond tater and is a professor at both american university and the university of virginia. , a manmmediate left described as the conscience of the u.s. congress among john lewis, a congressman from georgia since 1986. at 23, 1 of the
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